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study finds aesthetics in food packaging as important as brand namesstudy finds aesthetics in food packaging as important as brand namesstudy finds aesthetics in food packaging as important as brand names

by:Top-In     2020-01-25
CALGARY —
A study by the University of Calgary shows that packaging food into beautiful packaging can affect children\'s food choices, just as the research by McDonald\'s Professor Charlene Elliott was based on Stanford a few years ago.
Stanford University research found that preschool children think that foods packed with McDonald\'s taste better than those packed with ordinary food.
In this study, children even prefer the taste of carrots packed in McDonald\'s.
\"This is a very provocative study,\" Elliott said . \".
\"Considering the choice of packaging in something completely normal and something decorated, it\'s not surprising that preschool children prefer to decorate the food in the packaging.
According to Elliott, Stanford University\'s research lacks depth, so it was revised.
\"We redesigned the study to determine if the brand influenced taste preferences or was it actually the aesthetics of the packaging itself?
In Elliott\'s study, 65 preschool children
Older children are required to choose food in a variety of packages, including Starbucks.
A brand that a child may not be familiar.
The children were asked to choose between McDonald\'s and the plain white packaging;
McDonald\'s and non-branded color packaging;
There are also McDonald\'s and Starbucks packaging.
\"It\'s not surprising that preschool children think that the food in the decorative wrapping paper tastes the best compared to the food in the normal packaging, even though they are the same,\" she said . \".
\"But this is not a brand preference . . . . . . More aesthetics.
\"The same proportion of children prefer McDonald\'s burgers in Starbucks packaging instead of McDonald\'s burgers in McDonald\'s packaging.
For chips and carrots, most children say the taste of the sample is the same.
However, for those kids who do show preference, more kids prefer the taste of chips and carrots in Starbucks rather than McDonald\'s.
\"So wrap it up in a beautiful package,\" she said . \".
Elliott holds the Canadian Research Chair in food marketing, policy and child health.
Her findings are published in the Canadian Journal of Public Health.
But the owner of the Calgary daycare center is not sure if the packaging is the main factor in making children eat.
\"They are definitely picky,\" Marc St said . \"
Germain with FunFlex Playcare.
\"That\'s why I try to keep the menu simple.
I\'m not going to make lentils soup because I know the kids are going to throw it away.
\"I can make a lentil soup that looks really good on the menu and looks good for parents, but on the way I know they may not eat it no matter what the packaging is. \"St.
Germain said that his facilities ensure that it provides the choice of groups in the Canadian food guide, but he believes it is familiar with the food provided, which will exceed the colorful packaging.
Pre-sales Canada-
A study by the University of Calgary shows that packaging food into beautiful packaging can affect children\'s food choices, just as the research by McDonald\'s Professor Charlene Elliott was based on Stanford a few years ago.
Stanford University research found that preschool children think that foods packed with McDonald\'s taste better than those packed with ordinary food.
In this study, children even prefer the taste of carrots packed in McDonald\'s.
\"This is a very provocative study,\" Elliott said . \".
\"Considering the choice of packaging in something completely normal and something decorated, it\'s not surprising that preschool children prefer to decorate the food in the packaging.
According to Elliott, Stanford University\'s research lacks depth, so it was revised.
\"We redesigned the study to determine if the brand influenced taste preferences or was it actually the aesthetics of the packaging itself?
In Elliott\'s study, 65 preschool children
Older children are required to choose food in a variety of packages, including Starbucks.
A brand that a child may not be familiar.
The children were asked to choose between McDonald\'s and the plain white packaging;
McDonald\'s and non-branded color packaging;
There are also McDonald\'s and Starbucks packaging.
\"It\'s not surprising that preschool children think that the food in the decorative wrapping paper tastes the best compared to the food in the normal packaging, even though they are the same,\" she said . \".
\"But this is not a brand preference . . . . . . More aesthetics.
\"The same proportion of children prefer McDonald\'s burgers in Starbucks packaging instead of McDonald\'s burgers in McDonald\'s packaging.
For chips and carrots, most children say the taste of the sample is the same.
However, for those kids who do show preference, more kids prefer the taste of chips and carrots in Starbucks rather than McDonald\'s.
\"So wrap it up in a beautiful package,\" she said . \".
Elliott holds the Canadian Research Chair in food marketing, policy and child health.
Her findings are published in the Canadian Journal of Public Health.
But the owner of the Calgary daycare center is not sure if the packaging is the main factor in making children eat.
\"They are definitely picky,\" Marc St said . \"
Germain with FunFlex Playcare.
\"That\'s why I try to keep the menu simple.
I\'m not going to make lentils soup because I know the kids are going to throw it away.
\"I can make a lentil soup that looks really good on the menu and looks good for parents, but on the way I know they may not eat it no matter what the packaging is. \"St.
Germain said that his facilities ensure that it provides the choice of groups in the Canadian food guide, but he believes it is familiar with the food provided, which will exceed the colorful packaging.
Pre-sales Canada-
A study by the University of Calgary shows that packaging food into beautiful packaging can affect children\'s food choices, just as the research by McDonald\'s Professor Charlene Elliott was based on Stanford a few years ago.
Stanford University research found that preschool children think that foods packed with McDonald\'s taste better than those packed with ordinary food.
In this study, children even prefer the taste of carrots packed in McDonald\'s.
\"This is a very provocative study,\" Elliott said . \".
\"Considering the choice of packaging in something completely normal and something decorated, it\'s not surprising that preschool children prefer to decorate the food in the packaging.
According to Elliott, Stanford University\'s research lacks depth, so it was revised.
\"We redesigned the study to determine if the brand influenced taste preferences or was it actually the aesthetics of the packaging itself?
In Elliott\'s study, 65 preschool children
Older children are required to choose food in a variety of packages, including Starbucks.
A brand that a child may not be familiar.
The children were asked to choose between McDonald\'s and the plain white packaging;
McDonald\'s and non-branded color packaging;
There are also McDonald\'s and Starbucks packaging.
\"It\'s not surprising that preschool children think that the food in the decorative wrapping paper tastes the best compared to the food in the normal packaging, even though they are the same,\" she said . \".
\"But this is not a brand preference . . . . . . More aesthetics.
\"The same proportion of children prefer McDonald\'s burgers in Starbucks packaging instead of McDonald\'s burgers in McDonald\'s packaging.
For chips and carrots, most children say the taste of the sample is the same.
However, for those kids who do show preference, more kids prefer the taste of chips and carrots in Starbucks rather than McDonald\'s.
\"So wrap it up in a beautiful package,\" she said . \".
Elliott holds the Canadian Research Chair in food marketing, policy and child health.
Her findings are published in the Canadian Journal of Public Health.
But the owner of the Calgary daycare center is not sure if the packaging is the main factor in making children eat.
\"They are definitely picky,\" Marc St said . \"
Germain with FunFlex Playcare.
\"That\'s why I try to keep the menu simple.
I\'m not going to make lentils soup because I know the kids are going to throw it away.
\"I can make a lentil soup that looks really good on the menu and looks good for parents, but on the way I know they may not eat it no matter what the packaging is. \"St.
Germain said that his facilities ensure that it provides the choice of groups in the Canadian food guide, but he believes it is familiar with the food provided, which will exceed the colorful packaging.
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