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the war on wastethe war on wastethe war on waste

by:Top-In     2020-08-08
Bob Beacock ignored the stench.
He walked into a pile of broken garbage bags stuck on a landfill in Ontario.
Dozens of seagulls digging umbrellas, wires, plastic canola oil containers and a 20-
1 liter plastic bucket
He shovels a battery with a shovel.
\"There\'s a real no
\"No,\" said the landfill operator in broktown.
\"I don\'t know how many times we told the public.
One thing I hate to see in a landfill is any battery.
\"These projects may have been transferred through a provincial waste transfer project in Ontario.
But they ended up here, just like they did at the Glenbrook landfill in Hamilton.
Projects like the blue box may convince the Ontario that they are doing everything they can to help the environment and reduce waste.
But the garbage problem
Metropolitan Special Report-
It shows that we are not as diligent as we think.
In the whole province, 55 of the garbage that can be recycled are finally landfill.
The Ontario Municipal Authority Association says that, as a result, landfill sites are filling up quickly and we are on the verge of a waste disposal crisis.
\"Our garbage continues to exceed the available landfill sites,\" said AMO president Gary McNamara . \".
\"We have to reduce our waste, recycle more, or accept new landfill sites or incinerators in our communities.
\"Over the past decade, governments have set ambitious waste transfer targets, but today more than half of the 5 million tons of waste collected annually by the Ontario roadside are dumped instead of being recycled or reused. That 2.
The 7 million tons of waste that could have been transferred is equivalent to the weight of 6,222 Boeing 747 aircraft.
For example, three-
The plastic that should be recycled will eventually be landfill.
Although organic matter accounts for about 1-
Out of the third waste in the province, only 40 per cent of Ontario have access to the roadside green box project.
\"We may not be in a crisis, but there is indeed pressure,\" said Pat Parker, director of waste management support services in Hamilton . \".
The city is 65-per-cent waste-
The target currently under review is the 2011 transfer target.
Although there is still about 25 years of life in the Glenbrook landfill, Hamilton\'s residential waste is there, the Hamilton people only transferred the garbage in 2010, up from the 45 reported in 2009, but still below target.
\"If we don\'t increase our attention, it could be a problem if we stay in the current state,\" Parker said . \".
On 2010, Hamilton sent 110,000 tons to the landfill.
Equivalent to about 4.
8 million garbage bags
The target of diversion rate of 65 is equivalent to 1.
Parker says 6 million bags must be removed from the landfill stream every year and then recycled or compost.
At Glanbrook, the city still has the option to increase capacity through new designs or equipment, and \"will continue to extend its life to the best of our ability.
\"But at some point something needs to be done,\" she said . \".
The city is reviewing its solid waste management plan.
Parker said it will seek public opinion in about a month as it looks at options on how to be above garbage in the future.
Across Ontario, $0. 32 billion was spent last year on waste transfer through industrial, municipal and provincial-funded projects.
Consumers also charge for certain products through Ecology.
The results of these projects are poor.
The Metroland special report says none of the communities have been investigated for garbagediversion goal.
Towns in Ontario have little impact on plastic bottles, cans, magazines, milk cartons and other household waste that eventually remain dumped on trucks.
A 2010 report by the Auditor General of Ontario, calculated by waste, ranked the province sixth in Canada
After Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, BC and Quebec, the diversion rate is far behind in most European countries.
\"There are a large number of people who are very religious and spend a lot of time and sorting,\" Beacock said on the Brock Township site in northeast Toronto . \".
\"Others do nothing.
It\'s just a bag inside and outside all wham bam on the side of the road.
\"The same items taken from the Brock dump by Beacock are piling up in municipal landfill sites across Ontario, leading to a crisis of concern to AMO.
Broktown will run out of space in two years.
Landfill sites in at least six cities, including Simcoe County, Northumberland and mascoka, will fill in within 10 years.
Brok is lucky: a new incinerator should be open in 2014 to replace all landfill sites in the Durham area.
At the same time, the garbage is transferred from a complete landfill in other parts of the area to a private landfill in northern New York.
Other communities are looking for solutions.
Landfill sites, including Guelph and Peel, have been closed and they are shipping garbage to other cities in Ontario.
Even green garbage is a problem.
As contractors in Ontario are unable to handle the full amount of the area, York will send some organic matter to Massachusetts.
Many Ontario may believe that Toronto\'s decision to stop shipping the city\'s domestic waste to Michigan at the end of 2010 marks the end of Ontario\'s garbage exports.
However, this practice continues.
Guelph has been delivering organic matter to an incinerator in Niagara Falls. Y.
Since 2006, a new composting facility has finally been opened in September.
\"As long as you have this escape valve (
Send to south)
\"No one will take this issue seriously,\" said Ben Bennett, spokesman for the municipal waste Association . \". The Auditor-
The general said the waste diversion rate is lagging because: cities with enough landfill space are unlikely to reduce roadside garbage collection and impose restrictions on garbage bags.
Municipalities must compete with each other and the private sector must sell recyclable and packaging materials.
Municipalities say industry has provided nearly $80 million for their share of $160. million-a-
The blue box plan for a year is not enough.
They also said it would be 40 cents cheaper to landfill materials that can be recycled.
Even the types of materials collected in the residential blue warehouse project vary from municipality to municipality.
Although aluminum foil, trays and takeout are acceptable
In addition to the container, others can only take one of these materials or reject all the materials.
Trevor Barton, head of waste management planning for the Peel area, said: \"You went to the country cottage and the situation was different . \".
\"You go to the neighboring city and the situation is different.
This is very frustrating for the residents.
\"Bob Beacock ignored the stench.
He walked into a pile of broken garbage bags stuck on a landfill in Ontario.
Dozens of seagulls digging umbrellas, wires, plastic canola oil containers and a 20-
1 liter plastic bucket
He shovels a battery with a shovel.
\"There\'s a real no
\"No,\" said the landfill operator in broktown.
\"I don\'t know how many times we told the public.
One thing I hate to see in a landfill is any battery.
\"These projects may have been transferred through a provincial waste transfer project in Ontario.
But they ended up here, just like they did at the Glenbrook landfill in Hamilton.
Projects like the blue box may convince the Ontario that they are doing everything they can to help the environment and reduce waste.
But the garbage problem
Metropolitan Special Report-
It shows that we are not as diligent as we think.
In the whole province, 55 of the garbage that can be recycled are finally landfill.
The Ontario Municipal Authority Association says that, as a result, landfill sites are filling up quickly and we are on the verge of a waste disposal crisis.
\"Our garbage continues to exceed the available landfill sites,\" said AMO president Gary McNamara . \".
\"We have to reduce our waste, recycle more, or accept new landfill sites or incinerators in our communities.
\"Over the past decade, governments have set ambitious waste transfer targets, but today more than half of the 5 million tons of waste collected annually by the Ontario roadside are dumped instead of being recycled or reused. That 2.
The 7 million tons of waste that could have been transferred is equivalent to the weight of 6,222 Boeing 747 aircraft.
For example, three-
The plastic that should be recycled will eventually be landfill.
Although organic matter accounts for about 1-
Out of the third waste in the province, only 40 per cent of Ontario have access to the roadside green box project.
\"We may not be in a crisis, but there is indeed pressure,\" said Pat Parker, director of waste management support services in Hamilton . \".
The city is 65-per-cent waste-
The target currently under review is the 2011 transfer target.
Although there is still about 25 years of life in the Glenbrook landfill, Hamilton\'s residential waste is there, the Hamilton people only transferred the garbage in 2010, up from the 45 reported in 2009, but still below target.
\"If we don\'t increase our attention, it could be a problem if we stay in the current state,\" Parker said . \".
On 2010, Hamilton sent 110,000 tons to the landfill.
Equivalent to about 4.
8 million garbage bags
The target of diversion rate of 65 is equivalent to 1.
Parker says 6 million bags must be removed from the landfill stream every year and then recycled or compost.
At Glanbrook, the city still has the option to increase capacity through new designs or equipment, and \"will continue to extend its life to the best of our ability.
\"But at some point something needs to be done,\" she said . \".
The city is reviewing its solid waste management plan.
Parker said it will seek public opinion in about a month as it looks at options on how to be above garbage in the future.
Across Ontario, $0. 32 billion was spent last year on waste transfer through industrial, municipal and provincial-funded projects.
Consumers also charge for certain products through Ecology.
The results of these projects are poor.
The Metroland special report says none of the communities have been investigated for garbagediversion goal.
Towns in Ontario have little impact on plastic bottles, cans, magazines, milk cartons and other household waste that eventually remain dumped on trucks.
A 2010 report by the Auditor General of Ontario, calculated by waste, ranked the province sixth in Canada
After Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, BC and Quebec, the diversion rate is far behind in most European countries.
\"There are a large number of people who are very religious and spend a lot of time and sorting,\" Beacock said on the Brock Township site in northeast Toronto . \".
\"Others do nothing.
It\'s just a bag inside and outside all wham bam on the side of the road.
\"The same items taken from the Brock dump by Beacock are piling up in municipal landfill sites across Ontario, leading to a crisis of concern to AMO.
Broktown will run out of space in two years.
Landfill sites in at least six cities, including Simcoe County, Northumberland and mascoka, will fill in within 10 years.
Brok is lucky: a new incinerator should be open in 2014 to replace all landfill sites in the Durham area.
At the same time, the garbage is transferred from a complete landfill in other parts of the area to a private landfill in northern New York.
Other communities are looking for solutions.
Landfill sites, including Guelph and Peel, have been closed and they are shipping garbage to other cities in Ontario.
Even green garbage is a problem.
As contractors in Ontario are unable to handle the full amount of the area, York will send some organic matter to Massachusetts.
Many Ontario may believe that Toronto\'s decision to stop shipping the city\'s domestic waste to Michigan at the end of 2010 marks the end of Ontario\'s garbage exports.
However, this practice continues.
Guelph has been delivering organic matter to an incinerator in Niagara Falls. Y.
Since 2006, a new composting facility has finally been opened in September.
\"As long as you have this escape valve (
Send to south)
\"No one will take this issue seriously,\" said Ben Bennett, spokesman for the municipal waste Association . \". The Auditor-
The general said the waste diversion rate is lagging because: cities with enough landfill space are unlikely to reduce roadside garbage collection and impose restrictions on garbage bags.
Municipalities must compete with each other and the private sector must sell recyclable and packaging materials.
Municipalities say industry has provided nearly $80 million for their share of $160. million-a-
The blue box plan for a year is not enough.
They also said it would be 40 cents cheaper to landfill materials that can be recycled.
Even the types of materials collected in the residential blue warehouse project vary from municipality to municipality.
Although aluminum foil, trays and takeout are acceptable
In addition to the container, others can only take one of these materials or reject all the materials.
Trevor Barton, head of waste management planning for the Peel area, said: \"You went to the country cottage and the situation was different . \".
\"You go to the neighboring city and the situation is different.
This is very frustrating for the residents.
\"Bob Beacock ignored the stench.
He walked into a pile of broken garbage bags stuck on a landfill in Ontario.
Dozens of seagulls digging umbrellas, wires, plastic canola oil containers and a 20-
1 liter plastic bucket
He shovels a battery with a shovel.
\"There\'s a real no
\"No,\" said the landfill operator in broktown.
\"I don\'t know how many times we told the public.
One thing I hate to see in a landfill is any battery.
\"These projects may have been transferred through a provincial waste transfer project in Ontario.
But they ended up here, just like they did at the Glenbrook landfill in Hamilton.
Projects like the blue box may convince the Ontario that they are doing everything they can to help the environment and reduce waste.
But the garbage problem
Metropolitan Special Report-
It shows that we are not as diligent as we think.
In the whole province, 55 of the garbage that can be recycled are finally landfill.
The Ontario Municipal Authority Association says that, as a result, landfill sites are filling up quickly and we are on the verge of a waste disposal crisis.
\"Our garbage continues to exceed the available landfill sites,\" said AMO president Gary McNamara . \".
\"We have to reduce our waste, recycle more, or accept new landfill sites or incinerators in our communities.
\"Over the past decade, governments have set ambitious waste transfer targets, but today more than half of the 5 million tons of waste collected annually by the Ontario roadside are dumped instead of being recycled or reused. That 2.
The 7 million tons of waste that could have been transferred is equivalent to the weight of 6,222 Boeing 747 aircraft.
For example, three-
The plastic that should be recycled will eventually be landfill.
Although organic matter accounts for about 1-
Out of the third waste in the province, only 40 per cent of Ontario have access to the roadside green box project.
\"We may not be in a crisis, but there is indeed pressure,\" said Pat Parker, director of waste management support services in Hamilton . \".
The city is 65-per-cent waste-
The target currently under review is the 2011 transfer target.
Although there is still about 25 years of life in the Glenbrook landfill, Hamilton\'s residential waste is there, the Hamilton people only transferred the garbage in 2010, up from the 45 reported in 2009, but still below target.
\"If we don\'t increase our attention, it could be a problem if we stay in the current state,\" Parker said . \".
On 2010, Hamilton sent 110,000 tons to the landfill.
Equivalent to about 4.
8 million garbage bags
The target of diversion rate of 65 is equivalent to 1.
Parker says 6 million bags must be removed from the landfill stream every year and then recycled or compost.
At Glanbrook, the city still has the option to increase capacity through new designs or equipment, and \"will continue to extend its life to the best of our ability.
\"But at some point something needs to be done,\" she said . \".
The city is reviewing its solid waste management plan.
Parker said it will seek public opinion in about a month as it looks at options on how to be above garbage in the future.
Across Ontario, $0. 32 billion was spent last year on waste transfer through industrial, municipal and provincial-funded projects.
Consumers also charge for certain products through Ecology.
The results of these projects are poor.
The Metroland special report says none of the communities have been investigated for garbagediversion goal.
Towns in Ontario have little impact on plastic bottles, cans, magazines, milk cartons and other household waste that eventually remain dumped on trucks.
A 2010 report by the Auditor General of Ontario, calculated by waste, ranked the province sixth in Canada
After Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, BC and Quebec, the diversion rate is far behind in most European countries.
\"There are a large number of people who are very religious and spend a lot of time and sorting,\" Beacock said on the Brock Township site in northeast Toronto . \".
\"Others do nothing.
It\'s just a bag inside and outside all wham bam on the side of the road.
\"The same items taken from the Brock dump by Beacock are piling up in municipal landfill sites across Ontario, leading to a crisis of concern to AMO.
Broktown will run out of space in two years.
Landfill sites in at least six cities, including Simcoe County, Northumberland and mascoka, will fill in within 10 years.
Brok is lucky: a new incinerator should be open in 2014 to replace all landfill sites in the Durham area.
At the same time, the garbage is transferred from a complete landfill in other parts of the area to a private landfill in northern New York.
Other communities are looking for solutions.
Landfill sites, including Guelph and Peel, have been closed and they are shipping garbage to other cities in Ontario.
Even green garbage is a problem.
As contractors in Ontario are unable to handle the full amount of the area, York will send some organic matter to Massachusetts.
Many Ontario may believe that Toronto\'s decision to stop shipping the city\'s domestic waste to Michigan at the end of 2010 marks the end of Ontario\'s garbage exports.
However, this practice continues.
Guelph has been delivering organic matter to an incinerator in Niagara Falls. Y.
Since 2006, a new composting facility has finally been opened in September.
\"As long as you have this escape valve (
Send to south)
\"No one will take this issue seriously,\" said Ben Bennett, spokesman for the municipal waste Association . \". The Auditor-
The general said the waste diversion rate is lagging because: cities with enough landfill space are unlikely to reduce roadside garbage collection and impose restrictions on garbage bags.
Municipalities must compete with each other and the private sector must sell recyclable and packaging materials.
Municipalities say industry has provided nearly $80 million for their share of $160. million-a-
The blue box plan for a year is not enough.
They also said it would be 40 cents cheaper to landfill materials that can be recycled.
Even the types of materials collected in the residential blue warehouse project vary from municipality to municipality.
Although aluminum foil, trays and takeout are acceptable
In addition to the container, others can only take one of these materials or reject all the materials.
Trevor Barton, head of waste management planning for the Peel area, said: \"You went to the country cottage and the situation was different . \".
\"You go to the neighboring city and the situation is different.
This is very frustrating for the residents.
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